The best way to interact with people who have disabilities is to see them the way they see themselves, which can definitely be a challenge as we exist in our own minds. Take cues from the person with disabilities. If they demonstrate a high level of independence, then don’t try to do things for them or “baby” them in any way.

If a person with disabilities requests assistance, then help. In either case, you allow them to showcase how they wish to be treated.


While walking on the sidewalks, you may have noticed small, colorful bumps where the sidewalk meets the road. What are these bumps? Why are they placed so strategically at the edge of the sidewalk, at crosswalks, and near public transportation? What purpose do they serve? Are they there to increase the grip on the road? Or, do they serve some other purpose? Let’s find out!


Most suburban areas in the United States are created for the able-bodied individuals who own a car. Neighborhoods rarely have sidewalks, and many roads are long connecting points between neighborhoods and shopping centers. While suburbia may be a great area for a casual stroll, it’s not exactly great for those trying to get from home to work.