The etiquette of interacting with a wheelchair user is rather simple if we make it so. From an early age, we learn our society’s rules for interacting with one another; however, society doesn’t offer clear-cut standards for interacting with people who use wheelchairs. When meeting a person using a mobility device in public or social situations, some people might freeze up, act in a patronizing way, or ignore the person completely.

People are people—no matter what.


On Monday, March 18th, Google Doodle featured the Japanese inventor of detectable dome tiles, Seiichi Miyake. His invention changed the world by empowering and protecting individuals with visual impairments to cross streets with greater ease. Fifty-two years have passed since the first dome tiles were installed, and these detectable warning tiles are now part of many cities throughout the world.


ADA compliance for temporary events is just as important as ADA compliance for public areas and private businesses. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prevents discrimination towards individuals with vision loss, hearing issues, and other disabilities. When it comes to accessibility, the ADA outlines certain standards to ensure that public areas, even temporary events, are accessible to people with impairments.