People who lose their vision, whether at birth or later in life, must learn how to navigate the world a little bit differently. For those with vision, it can be difficult to understand how someone with limited or no sight sees the world. Yet, people with blindness live full, independent lives just like the rest of us. And this guide will help you to better understand the ends and outs of a world without sight.


Just as societies innately understand the subtle rules of social interaction, there is also an etiquette for interacting with a blind person or someone with low vision. People with vision often struggle to interact with others who have vision impairment. People freeze, uncertain of what to do, or communicate in a demoralizing way. But that doesn’t have to be the case.


The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) sets a number of standards to govern curb ramps and to determine wheelchair accessibility. Curbs create an increased likelihood of injury or accidents for people who use a wheelchair or walker. For a person with a disability, curbs without a ramp could become unusable and be considered discriminatory.