01 Nov

ADA Compliance Means Safety For All


While the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) outlines a set of standards for accommodating the needs of individuals with disabilities, ADA compliance is something that benefits everyone. When our businesses, neighborhoods, and local government agencies work to be considerate of individuals with differing needs, our inclusive community provides the space to recognize the unique gifts and perspectives that these individuals can offer.

31 Oct

Accessible Pedestrian Signal Models


To create an accessible world and to comply with ADA standards, accessible pedestrian signal (APS) models work with detectable warning tiles to keep pedestrians of all abilities safe around vehicle intersections and street crosswalks. These APS models mark heavily trafficked areas in cities with a button for audio directions for individuals with low visibility. A number of APS tools offer direction and aid to individuals with differing abilities, including a rapid tick sound, speech indication, tactile signals, and vibrating indications.

09 Oct

Grey Infrastructure, Coastal Cities, and Climate Change: How Communities Can Prepare for Increased Flooding


Cities are about to get much wetter as global warming increases the intensity of storms, raises sea levels, and disrupts established climate expectations. Moreover, grey infrastructures in cities are straining to keep up with the growth of urban populations. The pattern of increased storms and frequent flooding requires cities to be proactive in finding a solution for water management and emergency systems or risk being overwhelmed by flooding and constant clean-up.

26 Sep

Heat Series: Immediate Actions Cities Can Take to Reduce Heat


The shift in weather patterns, temperatures, and precipitation has grabbed the attention of scientists, politicians, and society. With more than 80% of the United States population living in cities, studies reveal that these negative weather changes are heightened in these areas due to the infrastructure and population density.

13 Aug

The Danger of Non-ADA-Compliant and Broken Sidewalks


Sidewalk cracks are often an accepted reality of city living, however, non-ADA-compliant and broken sidewalks often result in injury for pedestrians, unnavigable sidewalks for people with mobility devices, and lawsuits against the city.

It’s not unusual to find missing pavement, crumbling curbs, and weeds sprouting between cracks. However, for people who use wheelchairs, broken sidewalks can be impossible to navigate, forcing them to stay at home or use the road to get around. So a simple crack in a sidewalk is not so simple and potentially dangerous.

29 May

Thin-set or Wet-set Installation Applications for Detectable Warning Tile in Curb Ramps


How detectable warning tiles are installed is crucial to the longevity of the project. There are two types of installations that you need to know about: wet-set and thin-set. Both the wet-set and thin-set installation methods can be used on new construction as well as upgrading pre-existing ramps. Each type of installation can provide longevity and durability when installed correctly.
 

04 Apr

An Ode to Seiichi Miyake: The Inventor of Dome Tiles


On Monday, March 18th, Google Doodle featured the Japanese inventor of detectable dome tiles, Seiichi Miyake. His invention changed the world by empowering and protecting individuals with visual impairments to cross streets with greater ease. Fifty-two years have passed since the first dome tiles were installed, and these detectable warning tiles are now part of many cities throughout the world.

14 Mar

7 Ways Cities Could Do Better For Accessibility


Cities offer a wealth of opportunities, both in terms of jobs and accessibility. However, some of those same cities don’t have easily accessible sidewalks, transportation, or office buildings. Although there have been great improvements in accessibility, some cities still have many steps they can take to be more livable and convenient. With the creation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), many cities are obligated to add detectable warning tiles to their sidewalks and curb cutouts.

13 Feb

Public Areas that Need to Be ADA Compliant


The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) expects workplaces and public areas to be accessible for people with disabilities. Since 1990, businesses and communities strive to meet these requirements. For example, public areas must take steps to remove barriers and add domed-tile curb ramps to improve accessibility and safety for people with impairments.

01 Dec

3 Cities Taking On ADA Compliant Curb Ramps


The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) sets a number of standards to govern curb ramps and to determine wheelchair accessibility. Curbs create an increased likelihood of injury or accidents for people who use a wheelchair or walker. For a person with a disability, curbs without a ramp could become unusable and be considered discriminatory.